John Paul Mac Isaac asks for Hunter Biden probe over false laptop report

Hunter Biden and his attorneys may have broken the law by using false information last week to report that his laptop had been “stolen”, claim lawyers for John Paul Mac Isaac — the beleaguered former owner of the computer repair shop where the first son abandoned his the infamous MacBook.

In letters sent Monday to Attorney General Merrick Garland and his Delaware counterpart Kathy Jennings, Mac Isaac’s lawyers allege that Hunter attorney Abbe Lowell potentially violated federal and state laws by “knowingly using false information to report an alleged crime and allowing that information to be disseminated to the media” when he alleged that Mac Isaac had “unlawfully accessed” and disseminated the contents of Hunter’s laptop.

Mac Isaac’s attorney, Brian Della Rocca, took a particular issue with Lowell’s claim that the shop owner unlawfully accessed and Hunter copied Biden’s laptop data without his consent.

“John Paul received Hunter Biden’s consent to access his laptop when Hunter Biden signed off on the work authorization while at The Mac Shop on April 12, 2019 …,” Della Rocca wrote. “Pursuant to the work order, signed by Hunter, when he failed to retrieve his laptop and the hard drive to which the data was recovered more than 90 days later, it became abandoned property so John Paul could dispose of it as he saw fit. John Paul determined the best disposal of the laptop and hard drive would be to turn them over to the authorities.”


Lawyers for computer repairman John Paul Mac Isaac claimed that Hunter Biden and his attorneys broke the law by claiming his laptop was "stolen."
Lawyers for computer repairman John Paul Mac Isaac claimed that Hunter Biden and his attorneys broke the law by claiming his laptop was “stolen.”
James Keivom

Mac Isaac's lawyers said in a letter to AG Merrick Garland and Delaware AG Kathy Jennings that Hunter's lawyer Abee Lowell “knowingly using false information to report an alleged crime."
Mac Isaac’s lawyers said in a letter to AG Merrick Garland and Delaware AG Kathy Jennings that Hunter’s lawyer Abee Lowell “knowingly using false information to report an alleged crime.”

Della Rocca also denied Lowell’s claim that Mac Isaac unlawfully shared the laptop with allies of former President Donald Trump and profited from doing so, saying Mac Isaac never disseminated the laptop’s contents to the media or made a dime out of it.

“John Paul did share the original laptop and external hard drive with the FBI in December 2019,” Mac Isaac’s attorney wrote. “Thereafter, while watching the impeachment hearings against President Trump in 2020, John Paul was concerned that there was no mention of the information on the laptop. It seemed as if no one even knew about the laptop.

“At that point, John Paul decided that he would try to get the information to Congress. When his efforts failed, he went to President Trump’s attorney, Rudy Giuliani … Whether you believe President Trump should have been impeached or not, John Paul did the right thing in approaching the President’s attorney with evidence that may help in the President’s defense.”

Della Rocca also fired back at Lowell’s claim that Mac Isaac, who is legally blind, could not have identified Hunter Biden as the person who dropped the laptop off at his store in April 2019.

“The fact that John Paul is legally blind did not render him unable to identify with whom he was working,” the lawyer wrote in response.

“While it may have created a difficulty identifying Hunter Biden in the beginning, to argue that his visual disability prevented him from using his other senses and his intelligence to identify his customer shows a level of ignorance and discrimination towards people living with difficulties.”

Della Rocca also rejected Lowell’s claim that Yaacov Apelbaum, founder and CEO of cyber analytics firm XRVision, was “working with Senator Ron Johnson’s office” when he helped Mac Isaac create a “forensic image” of Hunter’s laptop hard drive.

“It is false, as Yaacov has never worked with Senator Johnson’s office,” wrote Della Rocca, who added that Apelbaum was only asked to analyze information on the laptop and not to copy it.

Della Rocca says Hunter’s legal broadsides against Mac Isaac are an attempt to intimidate him after Mac Isaac launched a defamation action against the Biden scion.

“John Paul has suffered the loss of his business, friendships, and lives in constant fear. It is time to let Hunter Biden know that enough is enough.”

Della Rocca says he wrote to Garland and Jennings to expose “the outright lies used by Hunter Biden and his attorney to try to manipulate public opinion … I am disappointed that I even had to prepare these letters”.


Mac Isaac contends that Hunter Biden gave him consent to access the laptop for repairs and that it was later abandoned.
Mac Isaac contends that Hunter Biden gave him consent to access the laptop for repairs at his shop and that it was later abandoned.
Photo by ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

“While I respect your office’s ability to differentiate between a political ploy and a real legal request, I am compelled to write because my clients have become the victims of these unethical political games masked as a legal request,” wrote Della Rocca.

Della Rocca also suggested that the federal Department of Justice and its Delaware counterpart should investigate Hunter and Lowell over the false complaint.

“During that investigation, perhaps Hunter Biden should provide verifiable evidence of his whereabouts on April 12, 2019, [the date he left his laptop at Mac Isaac’s store] … Such an inquiry could resolve many of the lies being levied at John Paul.”

For Mac Isaac, who has written a book about his experience, “American Injustice,” the nightmare continues.

“I am already feeling the fallout from Hunter Biden’s letter,” he told The Post on Monday. “Once again, with the mainstream media’s help, half the country wants to see me imprisoned.”

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